General | July 13, 2021

What may be causing my low back pain?

Dr David Tang-OSTEOPATH-Double Bachelor of Health Science/Applied Science (Osteopathy) – Member Osteopathy Australia

Back pain is one of the leading causes of disability, with 1 in 6 Australians reporting having back related problems. In other words, approximately 4 million people are living with back pain. The fortunate thing is that it is preventable and manageable with the right intervention.

Common causes of lower back pain include:

· Muscular strains or spasm

· Facet or joint sprain

· Nerve compression/ disc injuries

· Age related changes

· Hip or lumbar immobility

Common contributing factors for lower back pain include:

· Sitting for too long

· Repetitive tasks

· Poor posture

· Weight

· Previous injury

· Muscular weakness or stiffness

· Stress

Sitting for prolonged periods can lead to muscular stiffness and increased pain. This stiffness may lead to restricted movement and reduced flexibility making it difficult to return to activity, and also prolonging recovery.

Things you can do to help manage your symptoms at home include:

– Stretching, mobility, strengthening and aerobic exercise

– Supplementation with magnesium

– Postural or ergonomic changes

Medication for pain relief, such as paracetamol, or anti-inflammatories including aspirin or ibuprofen are also recommended to help minimise pain and to give you the opportunity to perform your rehabilitative exercises. However, some medication should be used with caution as side effects such as stomach irritation can occur. For further information and clarity regarding medication usage, consult your general practitioner or local pharmacist.

To gain a better understanding of what may be causing your low back pain, you can book an appointment online or over the phone with one of our osteopaths at Western Region Health and Osteopathy.

References:

1. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/back-pain

2. https://www.health.harvard.edu/pain/where-to-turn-for-pain-relief-acetaminophen-or-nsaids